April 2021 Edition of The Whistler

April is Alcohol Awareness Month

• Alcohol is the most commonly used addictive substance in the United States
• One in every 12 adults suffers from alcohol abuse or dependence.
• More than half of all adults have a family history or alcoholism or problem drinking.
• More than 7 million children live in a home where at least one parent is dependent on or has abused alcohol.
• 100,000 people die each year from alcohol-related causes.
• Alcohol-related problems cost America $224 billion in lost productivity, absenteeism, healthcare costs, crime and family related problems.

Click here to continue reading the April 2021 edition of The Whistler.

March 2021 Edition of The Whistler

March is National Nutrition Month®

Tips for Successful Meals

Preparing food at home can be a great way to save money, express creativity, & stay on track with healthful eating. However, cooking can also be a challenge. With a few tips & tools, cooking at home becomes a little bit easier for everyone!

Click here to continue reading the March 2021 edition of The Whistler.

February 2021 Edition of The Whistler

Vaccines

Let’s talk about shots…Why Stay Up To Date on Vaccines?

Here are several reasons why…

*Vaccines aren’t just for kids.
Vaccines are recommended throughout people’s lives.

*Adults are at risk.
Most illnesses, hospitalization, disability, and deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases occur among
adults.

Click here to continue reading the February 2021 edition of The Whistler.

January 2021 Edition of The Whistler

National Bath Safety Month

Throughout the month of January, take part in National Bath Safety Month.

Before you grab the bubble bath and have a good soak, make sure you take a few precautionary measures to prevent an accident from happening to you or a loved one. Each year thousands of people of all ages visit the emergency room due to bathroom-related slips and falls. The accidents that occur while bathing are often overlooked, but remind us the importance of recognizing bathroom safety.

Click here to continue reading the January 2021 edition of The Whistler.

December 2020 Edition of The Whistler

Winter

The first of December marks the first day of Meteorological Winter. What does this mean? You’ve always heard that winter in the Northern Hemisphere starts on 21 December but that is the start of Astronomical Winter. The main difference between Astronomical Winter and Meteorological Winter is that Astronomical Winter is based on the Earth’s position in relation to the sun, while Meteorological Winter is based on the three coldest months of the year. Now that winter is here, are you ready?

Click here to continue reading the December 2020 edition of The Whistler.

October 2020 Edition of The Whistler

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Ask your doctor when you should get a mammogram.

Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms.

Click here to continue reading the October 2020 edition of The Whistler.

September 2020 Edition of The Whistler

All About Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia that targets the brain. Ultimately, Alzheimer’s damages a person’s mental ability and can cause symptoms such as memory loss in adults of all ages. Most cases are seen in individuals who are sixty years of age and older.

Click here to continue reading the September 2020 edition of The Whistler.

August 2020 Edition of The Whistler

Adult Vaccines

There Are Vaccines You Need as an Adult

You may not realize that you need vaccines throughout your life. Adults need to keep their vaccinations up to date because immunity from childhood vaccines can wear off over time. You are also at risk for different diseases as an adult. Vaccination is one of the most convenient and safest preventive care measures available.

Click here to continue reading the August 2020 edition of The Whistler.

June 2020 Edition of The Whistler

Preventing Tick Bites

Before You Go Outdoors:
Know where to expect ticks. Ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas, or even on animals. Spending time outside walking your dog, camping, gardening, or hunting could bring you in close contact with ticks. Many people get ticks in their own yard or neighborhood.
Avoid Contact with Ticks
Avoid wooded and brushy areas with high grass and leaf litter.
Walk in the center of trails.

Click here to continue reading the June 2020 edition of The Whistler.